Friday, 31 May 2013

Star Trek Cross Stitch preview

Out now is the latest Star Trek craft book, John Lohman's Star Trek: Cross Stitch. The book takes inspiration from across the franchise, with patterns and ideas for their uses ranging from Starfleet badge pillows to a 3D Borg Cube Christmas tree decoration. Here's the contents page (via Amazon's look inside preview), to give you an idea of the projects the book might inspire you to make:


Here is an example project, which has separate pages showing a real world example, some background on the design, a pattern, and detailed instructions:

 
 
 

StarTrek.com recently ran an interview with the author, continue after the jump for highlights of what he ahd to say about the book, and some more excerpts:

Lohman pointed out some of his favourites, of the thirty designs in the book:
My favorite project in the book is the badge pillows which feature a command gold, engineering red and science blue pillow with metallic badges stitched on the corner. I'm dying to get them back from the publisher because they absolutely need to be on my couch in my office at home. I also like the Borg cube tree ornament that was designed by Lord Libidan (lordlibidan.com/) because it is unique in that it involves stitching up 6 sides and assembling the project into a 3-dimensional cube. It;s a very unique take on the basic flat cross stitch that people are so used to seeing. Lastly I really have a special place for the Shut Up, Wesley! piece. It features Wesley Crusher in his iconic jumpsuit with the words "Shut Up, Wesley!" stitched over the top. That one had to be in the book as I grew up watching The Next Generation and loving to hate Wesley's character.

He also explained the process and his aims with the book:
Star Trek and cross stitch go together surprisingly well. There are so many iconic symbols, characters, and quotes across the Star Trek franchise that the projects weren't really very hard to come up with. Cross stitch is about taking complicated images and simplifying them to their most basic shape without losing the power of the original image. The strong symbols of the show are so ingrained in our minds that you don't lose much in the translation to little Xs on a piece of fabric
My goal was to make a book that could be appreciated by Star Trek fans who want to get into crafts as well as crafters getting into Star Trek. I tried to provide a spectrum of projects across the different shows and movies as well as a range of difficulty of crafting.
You can read the full interview on StarTrek.com.




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