Friday, 15 January 2010

Covers and blurbs for forthcoming prose

Between Amazon and Simon and Schuster there are a number of new and/or now-in-colour covers (including the supurb Seven Deadly Sins cover) for books coming up in the next few months, plus a new blurb or two:

Seven Deadly Sins

The Seven Deadly Sins delineate the path to a person’s downfall, the surest way to achieve eternal damnation.

But there is a way out, a way to reclaim salvation: blame it on the demons—taunting you, daring you to embrace these sins—and you shall be free. The painful truth is that these impulses live inside all of us, inside all sentient beings.

But alas, one person’s sin may be another being’s virtue.

The pride of the Romulan Empire is laid bare in “The First Peer,” by Dayton Ward and Kevin Dilmore. A Ferengi is measured by his acquisition of profit. “Reservoir Ferengi,” by David A.McIntee, depicts the greed that drives that need. The Cardassians live in a resource-poor system, surrounded by neighbors who have much more. The envy at the heart of Cardassian drive is “The Slow Knife,” by James Swallow. The Klingons have tried since the time of Kahless to harness their wrath with an honor code, but they haven’t done so, as evidenced in “The Unhappy Ones,”by Keith R.A. DeCandido. Humans’ darkest impulses run free in the Mirror Universe. “Freedom Angst,” by Britta Burdett Dennison, illustrates the lust that drives many there. The Borg’s desire to add to their perfection is gluttonous and deadly in “Revenant,”by Marc D. Giller. To be a Pakled is to live to up to the ideal of sloth in “Work Is Hard,” by Greg Cox.

As man expands beyond explored space, the need to find a way to make inhospitable planets hospitable grows greater. One young biologist, Carol Marcus, has a project that she is convinced can reshape planets. She puts together a team of young, committed scientists who dare to dream as she does: of a Federation remade so hunger is eradicated, where every world can be reshaped into a paradise. The belief that all things are possible, that man can strive to conquer space not with force but with science, is shared by James Kirk, a young Starfleet officer and her lover.

Leila Kalomi, a renowned botanist, is looking for a new direction. After hearing about Marcus's project, she applies for a position. She finds Carol's passion contagious, and a chance encounter with the Enterprise's science officer, Spock, convinces her to join Project: Inception.

Four people just trying to find the balance between their careers and their personal lives, trying to make the right choice not just for themselves but for the betterment of all mankind. The choices they make will rewrite the history of the Federation and change forever how man explores space.

The Children of Kings
(Back to it's initial title after briefly being called To Thine Own Self a couple of catalogues ago)

No comments: